Categories
Entertainment Hosting Tips Rules & Regulations Travel

Airbnb and Resy Simplify Dining Away from Home

With their new partnership, Airbnb and dining reservations app Resy make it easier than ever to get a taste of a new city.

“When you’re traveling,” says the video in the Airbnb blog post announcing the partnership, “all those unfamiliar options can make it hard to choose. That’s why Airbnb teamed up with Resy to handpick some of the best spots around, from local favorites to award winners.”

Now it’s possible to book a reservation at almost 650 restaurants in over 15 major U.S. cities, including Denver, San Francisco, Austin, Miami, and Washington, D.C. Through the Airbnb website or app, guests can choose the type of food they’re craving—from Indian cuisine to Japanese tapas and everything in between—and desired location. All of the restaurants on offer through Resy have been curated for their quality of food and service, so guests know they’re in for a good experience.

With Airbnb guests spending over $6.5 billion on dining in the last year (included in Airbnb’s restaurant report), it’s likely to be a lucrative partnership.

Looking toward the future, Airbnb plans to extend this service to international cities—and that’s not all. “We’re looking into allowing for even more dining options,” writes Airbnb in their blog post, “like exclusive tables for our users or social dining experiences where guests can share a meal and meet their fellow Airbnb travelers.”

Categories
Hosting Tips Rules & Regulations Travel

Partnering with a Rental Company vs. Doing It Alone

With the rise in popularity of short-term rentals, many owners are turning their investment properties into a second source of income. Once the decision to rent out the property using a short-term strategy has been made, there are numerous other questions that the owner must ask himself or herself: how much should I charge? How do I decorate my home? What do I include in my listing? Should I post on Airbnb, VRBO, or both?

There’s a lot to consider, especially when you’re starting out as a first-time renter. But the single most important decision you’ll make is whether you want to team up with a short-term rental management company or go at it alone.

One of the main benefits of a partnership with Effortless Rental Group is that you’ll be supported by a team of knowledgeable professionals who are dedicated to maximizing your monthly revenue. To learn how you can make exponentially more money when you work with us, versus renting on a short-term or long-term strategy alone, check out https://effortlessrentalgroup.com/hosting-tips/want-increase-earning-potential/

Increasing your earning potential is just the beginning. Effortless stands out from other rental management companies because we provide a turnkey service for our clients. This means that we take care of everything—from analytical pricing using our custom algorithms to handling all bookings and guest correspondence. Our professional cleaning company and re-stocking team will give you the peace of mind that everything is ready for your guests. In fact, many of our clients travel abroad for part of the year or even live out of state. They trust us to manage every single aspect of their rental property.

Owners who want to maximize their revenue and live their lives without worrying about the upkeep of their rental property choose to partner with Effortless Rental Group. We would be honored to work with you in the future. Please feel free to contact us anytime!

Effortless Rental Group

720.475.1486

Categories
Hosting Tips Rules & Regulations

2017 Brings Changes for Airbnb Renters

With the new year comes new responsibilities for short-term rental owners in the Denver area. Owners are now required to hold a short-term rental license, obtainable from the City and County of Denver website, in order to rent out their properties for stays shorter than 30 days. Not all American cities require a short-term license—state officials make the call on a case-by-case basis. Part of the licensing process involves proving that a property is an owner’s primary residence and posting his or her Business License Number on the Airbnb listing. The fee for the STR license application is $25 and an owner can be fined up to $999 for advertising their property without a legitimate license.

Learn more about the new Denver STR License at www.Denvergov.org/STR

Categories
Hosting Tips Rules & Regulations

Aurora Passed Short-term Rental Regulations

AURORA | City officials have agreed to allow residents to rent out their homes as vacation rentals using services like Air BnB, but  hosts of the increasingly popular short-term rentals must obtain business licenses and pay municipal lodger’s tax, ending a months-long logistical quagmire.

On Friday, Nov. 6, the city issued its first vacation rental business license to Saurabh Chawlah, an active Airbnb host who was barred from renting out his home on East Dry Creek Place in April after a neighbor complained about the amount of people frequently coming in and out of his east Aurora home.


“It was a long road, but I’m glad we got to this point,” Chawlah said. “
I’m glad that (the city) made this a priority over the past seven months — they did a pretty good job and they listened.”

The decision means that all vacation rental hosts with an Aurora address will have to apply for a $38 Aurora business license and collect an 8-percent lodger’s tax from each guest they host, according to Trevor Vaughn, manger of the city’s tax and licensing division. The business licenses must be renewed every two years for a $25 fee.

“It’s going to be an allowed home occupation,” Vaughn said.

He added that people who rent out all or a portion of their home to travelers may still be subject to a separate, state lodger’s tax of 4.25 percent.

Had the city not elected to pursue the current plan, Chawlah and his wife, Neha, would have had to pay upward of $4,000 for a conditional use permit and attend a public hearing to receive the approval of all residents and Homeowners Associations within one mile of their home.

The Chawlah’s re-listed their house on Airbnb early Friday, and Saurabh said that he plans on charging guests $45 per night. That price includes the now-mandatory lodger’s tax, which he will remit to the city on his own — not through the Airbnb website.

Vaughn said that the city has continuously pursued negotiations with sites like Airbnb to get them to agree to charging the required taxes at the point of sale instead of having individual hosts remit the city fees themselves on a monthly or quarterly basis.

“At this point, we are looking for more cooperation form the website providers in collecting and remitting the tax,” he said. “That’s something that we’ve been in touch with Airbnb about, but they haven’t cooperated yet. But I think that would be easier for all parties involved.”

Saurabh said that he’s proud of Aurora’s decision to allow vacation rentals by owners in the city, although he’s not certain how cozy other area Airbnb hosts will be to the notion of having to apply for a business license and charge guests an additional fee.

“Other hosts may not be too happy, but at least it will be an even playing field at that point,” he said.

There were about 40 Airbnb hosts serving Aurora visitors as of July, according to anecdotal data collected by the tax and licensing division. That’s a number nearly 10 times what it was early last year.

Prior to being shut down this spring, the Chawlahs had hosted about 55 guests in their Aurora home, according to Saurabh. He said that the majority of their visitors were people looking to stay close to Denver International Airport, students in town to interview at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, and younger professionals flying in for job interviews at in Downtown Denver.

Saurabh said that barring any loud or cantankerous behavior, city officials have told him that any future grievances from the next-door neighbor who lodged the initial complaint will be ignored.

“In regard to who’s coming in and out of our driveway, that’s not really that person’s concern,” he said. “We’ve been told that if they do complain it will be ignored unless something crazy happens with loud noise, music or a party. But just with people coming in and out, we’re free to do it.”

Despite Aurora’s new plan regarding Airbnb, a slew of other cities around the state and the country are still wrestling with how to regulate the ballooning sharing economy. Following a months-long moratorium on the practice, Boulder voters approved a 7.5 percent tax on short-term rentals in the city earlier this week. In the metro area, the Denver City Council is in the process of considering its own regulations on Airbnb and other vacation rentals by owner there.

Written by Quincy Snowdon, Reported by the Aurora Sentinel

https://www.aurorasentinel.com/news/aurora-reaches-accord-vacation-rental-owners-biz-licenses-taxes/